7 Natural Home Remedies for Weight Loss that Really Work

11 of 12

7. Start the Day with Eggs

If your usual breakfast consists of cereal or toast, switching to an egg breakfast could help you lose weight. Many popular breakfast foods, like bagels, waffles and croissants are high in carbohydrates. They cause a sharp rise in blood sugar which triggers the body to produce the hormone insulin. Insulin lowers blood sugar levels, but simultaneously activates fat storage and prevents the body from using fat as energy.

A medium egg contains virtually no carbohydrates, 6.4 grams of high quality protein and 13 essential vitamins and minerals. Two medium eggs boiled or poached contain just 132 calories, making them a nutrition-packed natural breakfast choice for weight loss. In addition, eggs have a 50% greater satiety index compared to breakfast cereal or white bread so they help keep you feeling fuller longer.

In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 30 overweight women consumed either an egg-based or bagel-based breakfast containing the same number of calories. Three and a half hours later they were given lunch. In the meantime, they filled out questionnaires about fullness and food cravings. Those who had the egg breakfast reported significantly greater feelings of satiety and consumed significantly fewer calories both at lunch and over the following 36 hours.

In another study published in the International Journal of Obesity, overweight or obese men and women were assigned to eat a calorie-matched egg or bagel breakfast as part of a low calorie weight-loss diet. After eight weeks, in comparison to participants on the bagel diet, those on the egg diet showed a 65% greater weight loss, a 61% greater reduction in BMI and a 34% greater reduction in waist measurement. Cholesterol levels did not differ between the two groups.

Beginning in the 1970s, people were advised to limit their consumption of eggs due to concerns that dietary cholesterol would raise blood cholesterol levels and increase the risk for coronary artery disease. However, numerous population studies conducted in more recent years do not support this theory. A 2012 meta-analysis of previous research concluded that higher consumption of eggs is not associated with increased risk of heart disease or stroke.

11 of 12